Willingboro Neighborhood Watch

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Watch Word 

“We’re Watching”  

www.willingborowatch.org

 Willingboro Neighborhood Watch

PO Box 834

Willingboro, NJ 08046

Quarterly Issue - October, 2016

 

 

 

 

Our Mission

The Willingboro Neighborhood Watch has been organized to promote the education of residents and businesses in the Township of Willingboro in areas of crime prevention and quality of life and to assist in the safeguarding of the community, its residents and their properties through voluntary activities including public information, problem solutions and addressing Township problems and concerns.

Neighborhood Watch is based on the premise that the role of watch groups is only to serve as the eyes and ears of law enforcement.  We encourage individual groups to work directly with their local law enforcement agencies to develop procedures for reporting suspicious activities.  At no time do we advocate any intervention actions by any watch group or individual.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Willingboro Neighborhood Watch

PO Box 834

Willingboro, NJ 08046

Quarterly Issue - October, 2017

 

Executive Board

President:  Charlotte Froman

Acting President:  Mary Jane Breen

Vice-President:  Josselyne Jackson

Secretary:  Henry Bass

Treasurer:  Celestina Miller

Director:  Gary Johnson

Director:  Jay Meyer

Chairpersons

Fundraising:  Paula Horvath

Webmaster:  Mary Jane Breen

Programs:  Josselyne Jackson

Newsletter: Jay Meyer

Social:  Vicki Benedict

Watch Word

“We’re Watching”   www.willingborowatch.org

Our Mission

Our Mission

The Willingboro Neighborhood Watch has been organized to promote the education of residents and businesses in the Township of Willingboro in areas of crime prevention and quality of life and to assist in the safeguarding of the community, its residents and their properties through voluntary activities including public information, problem solutions and addressing Township problems and concerns.

Neighborhood Watch is based on the premise that the role of watch groups is only to serve as the eyes and ears of law enforcement.  We encourage individual groups to work directly with their local law enforcement agencies to develop procedures for reporting suspicious activities.  At no time do we advocate any intervention actions by any watch group or individual.

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Supporting WNW

Please continue to support WNW by turning in your ShopRite receipts.  See Page 7 for details.

Paula Horvath, Fundraising Chairperson





Acting President’s Message

Dear Members,

Hope you are enjoying this warm start to Autumn! 

Now with Autumn, the trees are losing their leaves and we find ourselves preparing for the colder months, There is work to do outside and inside and safety concerns. Be careful working around your homes!

We need to check our heating systems, get our supplies for Winter weather and prepare our homes for the colder weather. Included in our issue are some suggestions about fire safety. We also want to keep ourselves, our families and community safe in all areas. Remember to call and report any suspicious activity. During our September meeting, safety booklets were provided by the Sheriff’s Department. Suggestions include: put a deadbolt lock on the exterior door to your house, the rear door should have a double cylinder dead bolt lock, install a “charlie bar” on every sliding glass door, drill and pin wooden sash windows, have adequate lighting, trim trees and shrubs blocking windows and doors.

For our October meeting, we have scheduled a School Board Election Forum. There are three board positions open and there are six candidates running to fill the positions.  We have invited all 6 candidates. Be sure to come out to our meeting October 25, 2017, hear what each candidate has to say, ask questions. Election will be Tuesday, November 7, 2017. Be sure to vote! Hope you all have a Happy Thanksgiving!

Even though this is a busy time of the year for us, our thoughts are with those who live in states and territories affected by the recent hurricanes and fires. Hoping those injured in the tragic Las Vegas shooting recover completely. Our condolences to families of those who lost their loved ones. 

Our President, Charlotte, thanks all for their thoughts, cards and wishes. She is working hard on her rehabilitation at Power Back Rehab. We’ll keep you informed of her progress.

On behalf of Charlotte, our WNW Board members and our Police Department, I wish you all a safe & happy end to 2017 and  healthy, prosperous 2018!

 

Mary Jane


General Meeting Minutes Overview

July 26 and September 25, 2017

July 26, 2017:  The General Meeting was called to order at 7:03 pm.

Acting President:  Minutes of the June meeting were approved.  Mary Jane congratulated Jay, Jackie and Cheri for assembling the Newsletter and mailing it in a timely fashion. The door in the back of the Township Building to the elevator will no longer be open to the public, however, due to complaints from seniors and disabled citizens, Charlotte said the Township Manager is looking in to the matter.    During August we will call members to see if they are still interested in attending Neighborhood Watch. Presently, 30 members may show up.  We voted to donate $250.00 to The Willingboro Police K9 Association. National Night Out Event will be July 31st in Mill Creek Park in Area D. The time is 6:00 pm-8:30 pm.

President:  Charlotte returned after a year of recovering from a major stroke.   Charlotte thanked everyone for their support as she continues her road to full recovery. Charlotte asked everyone to continue being vigilant.

Vice President:  Josselyne updated members on the speaker schedule for the rest of the year.

Treasurer:   As of July 30th, bank balance is $2,544.97 minus $90.00 for the WNW Post Office Box fee.

Director:  Jay spoke about a recent social security scam from a 323 area code. The scammer poses as a social security administration employee. Please call your local social security office or 1-800-772-1213 to report suspicious calls. Also call the Office of the Inspector General at 800-269-0271.  Preventive dental service is available to seniors as of September 2017 at Rowan College of Burlington County. The cost is $5.00 and the number to call is 856-291-4215.

The business meeting adjourned at 8:00 pm.

Josselyne introduced our featured speaker Lt. Vetter.  Lt. Vetter introduced Detective Galiazzi.,who informed members about the benefits of outdoor security cameras and registering them with the Police Department.  Lt. Vetter answered questions from citizens who live in Fairmont Park pertaining to the recent shootings.  Lt. Vetter gave an overview of the crimes and calls that have taken placed since May. Lt. Vetter said the police have answered 15,500 calls as of today. Heroin use is on the rise. Crime overall is down 20% and violent crime is up 14%.   If any citizen is interested in a detailed update of Willingboro crimes stats, it can be found on www.willingboro.police.org.

 

September 25, 2017: The general meeting was called to order at 7:00 pm.

Acting President:  Minutes of the July meeting were approved. Mary Jane updated us on Charlotte’s status. Charlotte had a setback due to a fall.  Charlotte is presently in Power Back Rehabilitation in Moorestown where she is receiving PT and OT services.  Paula Horvath visited Charlotte and stated that she is making progress but has a long road to recovery. Polly encouraged the members to send a card. However, Charlotte is not taking visitors. A container is provided at every meeting for donations for the food Bank at the Church of the Good Shepherd. Mary Jane has been working on a new member booklet.

Police:  Cheri thanked Neighborhood Watch for participating and attending the National Night Out Event in August.  Cheri also talked about the robocalls and their function.  Robo calls are placed the Monday or Tuesday prior to the Wednesday WNW Meeting by Cheri. If anyone has any question, Cheri can be contacted at (609)877-2200 ext. 1065. Lt Vetter informed members of the upcoming “Coffee with a Cop” on October 4 from 7-9am.  Lt Vetter updated us on the status of the shooting that took place in Fairmount Park in July.  Lt Vetter said the problem has been solved.  A resident asked Lt Vetter about the process to notify residents of recent shooting in their neighborhood. Lt Vetter informed the resident that the police department posts shooting and other relevant information on social media to include Facebook, Twitter, Nixle and www.willingboro.police.org.  The Chaplains that work with the Police will walk in the neighborhood to update residents on current events, e.g. shootings. Also, the chaplains will be asking residents questions about the shooting to gather information to assist the Police in finding the shooter or person of interest.

Vice President:  Josselyne updated members on the speaker schedule for the rest of the year and provided the names of School Board Candidates.

Treasurer:  Cheli reported that the bank balance as of August 31st was $2,405.17.

Director:  Jay requested input for Watchword articles.  ShopRite receipts are due October 5th

The Business Meeting adjourned at 7:30 pm.

Josselyne introduced our speaker Under Sheriff Bryan Norcross.  The sheriff’s primary responsibility is the court house at 49 Beverly Rancocas Rd. Under Sheriff explained their programs and entertained questions and passed out flyers.  

The General Meeting adjourned at 8:10 pm. 

                   

Respectfully submitted,

 

Henry Bass, Secretary


SEASONAL FIRES

For most, the kitchen is the heart of the home, especially during the holidays. From testing family recipes to decorating cakes and cookies, everyone enjoys being part of the preparations. So keeping fire safety top of mind in the kitchen during this joyous but hectic time is important, especially when there’s a lot of activity and people at home. As you start preparing your holiday schedule and organizing that large family feast, remember, by following a few simple safety tips you can enjoy time with your loved ones and keep yourself and your family safer from fire.

 

Thanksgiving by the numbers   Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.

 In 2014, nearly four times as many home cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving as on a typical day.

 In 2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 1,730 home cooking fires on Thanksgiving, the peak day for such fires.

 Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in cooking fires and fire deaths.

Cooking equipment was involved in almost half (48%) of all reported home fires and tied with heating equipment for the second leading cause of home fire deaths

 

Protect Yourself from Identity Theft

The Recent Equifax Breach May Require Multiple Layers of Protection

Equifax's massive data breach, disclosed nearly a month ago, has prompted millions of consumers to consider taking additional measures to guard their identities.

In that breach, more than 145 million consumers' names, birth dates, and Social Security numbers were exposed to hackers.

Equifax has announced that it will provide a year of free credit monitoring to all consumers. Additionally, it says it is developing a tool that will allow consumers to freeze and unfreeze their Equifax credit report as many times as they want at no charge.

Consumers who want to freeze their credit reports must deal directly with all three credit bureaus and, unless Experian and TransUnion follow Equifax in waiving the fees, incur a cost each time they do so.

Not a bulletproof solution

Many security experts say a credit freeze is the only way to prevent identity theft from taking place, but others point out that it doesn't work 100 percent of the time.

Gerri Detweiler, education director at Nav, a privacy protection company for small business owners, says a credit freeze may stop thieves from opening a new credit account in your name, but it won't prevent them from using one of your existing accounts if they have your personal information.

Your personal information could be used in phishing schemes, to submit fraudulent medical bills, and to file fake tax returns in your name.

"You have to be vigilant and carefully monitor your accounts, even with a freeze in place," Detweiler said. "A credit freeze doesn't mean you can set it and forget it."

Business is booming

A second option that consumers can turn to is credit monitoring. It won't prevent someone from stealing your identity, but it can limit the damage by alerting you immediately to fraudulent activities. There are many companies that offer this kind of service.

Lifelock is among the largest credit monitoring services, and it reported that its business surged in the wake of the Equifax breach. The company offers three levels of service. The basic plan costs $9.99 a month with increasing levels of service at $19.99 and $29.99 a month.

Another company, Privacy Guard, says it monitors customers' credit reports at all three credit bureaus. The company says it alerts customers when it sees changes in their credit reports, including credit inquiries and derogatory information. Like Lifelock, Privacy Guard offers three levels of protection at $9.99, $19.99, and $29.99 a month.

ID Shield, a division of Legal Shield, offers a similar credit monitoring service by using the Experian credit report. However, it has one price -- $9.95 a month. In addition to alerting customers to suspicious activity, ID Shield uses the Kroll detective agency to investigate any cases of customers' identity theft.

Evolving with the threat

Identity Guard started out two decades ago as a provider of basic credit reports, but has since evolved with the growing threat of identity theft. It provides three different monitoring plans, with the top two providing $1 million in insurance and stolen funds reimbursement.

The credit bureaus themselves -- Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion -- also provide credit monitoring services. In addition, consumers who want to freeze their credit reports must deal directly with all three credit bureaus and, unless Experian and TransUnion follow Equifax in waiving the fees, incur a cost each time they do so.

Source:  Mark Huffman, Consumer Affairs, Consumers Unified LLC, October 5, 2017

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Why Scammers Love Social Media

They find it easy to gain your trust on Facebook, Twitter and similar sites.

Learn how to avoid being burned by social scammers.

The 83-year-old Californian was flattered when the Facebook friend request arrived a few weeks ago. Joan (a pseudonym) was feeling lonely after the death of her husband and quickly became infatuated with the friend, who identified himself as Mark.

Passing himself off as a widower and a successful South Carolina building contractor, he began a whirlwind stream of text messages and gained her trust. He soon told her he’d been robbed after arriving in Africa for a big construction job, then hit another stroke of bad luck when he was hospitalized with a burst appendix. He also told her he had sent her a valuable antique, but Joan needed to send him $2,000 to cover delivery and shipping — and that he would pay her back. He also sought $8,500 for an airline ticket to travel back home. Joan soon wised up, thanks to advice from her son.

Mark “would text me all the time, it was very flattering. He said he was a churchgoing man. And his story was really believable,” said Joan, embarrassed to disclose her real name and how little she actually knew about him. 

Scammers have long used the internet to target people with their phony sweepstakes and hard luck stories. But the proliferation of social media sites is making it far easier for fraudsters to ingratiate themselves with victims and carry out an array of sophisticated money-sapping scams ranging from wire fraud to money laundering to identity theft.

“Scammers have been using email and telephone calls to target unsuspecting victims for years. Now, with today’s boom in social media use, the con artists are just as likely to use Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms to execute their insidious scams to steal people’s money and identities,” said AARP Fraud Watch Network Ambassador Frank Abagnale. He’s the infamous con artist turned security expert portrayed by Leo DiCaprio in the 2002 film Catch Me If You Can.

Variations of the Facebook friend scam abound, in part because there now are more than a billion active users, and partly because the scams are relatively easy to pull off. “You’d be surprised how quickly a scammer can escalate from a long lost friend to starting a relationship and then having an emergency or another reason to need money,’’ said AARP fraud expert Amy Nofziger.

Moreover, fraudsters use social media sites as a conduit for peddling their bogus shopping deals and coupon scams. Another popular ploy is the faux genealogy website, which dupes people into providing their credit card and Social Security number. Genealogy groups or individuals looking to study family histories will unwittingly share the faux website’s address.

How low will scammers stoop? Some are using social media to pretend that they are acting on behalf of charities, such as the Make-A-Wish Foundation scam. Others are resorting to mining information from death notices and obituaries. “There’s a lot of information in an obituary. Names of children and relatives. If I’m a criminal, I can call the widow and pretend to be a grandson who needs money to be bailed out of jail,’’ Nofziger said.

“In recent years, social media has become a hotbed for scam activity,” said James Foster, CEO of security adviser ZeroFox. “Scammers love these platforms because they make finding and engaging targets trivial, are easy and cost efficient to use, and have mechanisms like hashtags and follower lists to make getting the scam in front of the right group of targets simple. Best of all, they can distribute their scams at an unprecedented scale on social media. Scammers have a number of tricks up their sleeves: fake coupons, technical support scams, financial scams, fraudulent promotions and offers, fake gift card generators, pirated content, recruiter scams and much more. In short: be very careful what you click on social media. If it’s too good to be true, it probably is.”

There are many steps you can take to avoid becoming a con artist’s next victim. Here are some tips from Abagnale, the AARP Fraud Watch Network and other experts:

  • Think carefully about what you post about yourself, especially on Facebook. When you post that glorious beach photo, you’re signaling to the world that your home or business might be unprotected.
  • Limit access to your social media accounts to people you know.
  • Avoid posting a front-facing picture of your full face. A con artist can copy the image and use it to create a photo ID that can be used to steal your identity.
  • Take advantage of the privacy options to restrict your information so it can be viewed only by select people. Check your privacy settings regularly.
  • Be aware of dubious ads and fake news that you might click on, opening yourself up to phishing attacks or malware.
  • Don’t log in to your social media accounts via a public wireless network, where scammers can lurk and more easily grab information about you.
  • Be suspicious of unsolicited emails and requests from strangers to connect or be friends. Joan almost fell for a sweepstakes scam earlier this year. She’d been contacted by a company in Costa Rica, which told her she had won $100,000. But first she was told she had to provide an $8,000 money order to pay for the armored car that was to deliver the money. After talking with her son, she realized she was being duped.

Source:  Gary Strauss, AARP Fraud Watch Network, October 2, 2017

 

 

 

 


What Is Neighbor Spoofing?

Scammers can mimic your area code and phone number prefix to make their calls look local.

If you’ve been getting inundated with incoming phone calls that look a lot like your own number, you’re not alone.

This year has seen a spike in the practice dubbed “neighbor spoofing” — scammers and telemarketers using Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) software to mimic your area code and three-number prefix to make it appear as if an incoming call is originating from near your own location. The idea, security experts say, is that you’re more likely to answer an unfamiliar number if it looks close to yours — thinking it could be coming from your doctor’s office, or your child or grandchild’s school.

But once you pick up, it’s the same old robocall scam. The caller might pose as a debt collector or a travel company offering vacation deals — whatever it takes to separate you from your money.

The Federal Trade Commission is attempting to crack down on robocalls — last month, the agency made it easier to report troublemaking numbers and announced plans to provide daily updates of scam numbers to carriers. And in early summer, the Federal Communications Commission announced the arrest of a Miami scammer who was making more than a million neighbor-spoofed calls per day.

But the problem persists: According to the Robocall Index maintained by app maker YouMail, 2.6 billion robocalls were placed in July 2017, and the FTC reports that robocalls are the top complaint received by the agency. Even the Chairman of the FCC, Ajit Pai, isn’t immune: In a recent interview, he admitted that he gets neighbor-spoofed robocalls on his work phone.

The best advice, according to experts, is to ignore unknown numbers, even those that appear to be coming from your local area. That’s because once you pick up and engage with the call, you’re telling the software that yours is a real number, and you may then receive even more calls.

In addition, it’s a good idea not to use your phone number to sign up for services— online or in-person— if it’s not required. Scammers get their contacts from all sorts of sources, and it’s best to try to stay off as many lists as possible. And, if you haven’t already, sign up for the FTC’s Do Not Call registry — it may not keep away the scam artists, but it should cut down on calls from telemarketers.

Source:  Austin O’Connor, AARP Daily, September 19, 2017

Imposter Scam Tells Victims They Won the Sweepstakes

FTC Warns that Fraudsters Are Exploiting Make-A-Wish to Rake in Money

The Federal Trade Commission is warning Americans to beware of impostors who, in the guise of being from a government agency, call to inform people they have won a huge sweepstakes from the Make-A-Wish Foundation, a well-known charity for sick children.

The scammers, who claim to be from the FTC or another agency, say the winner must first pay thousands of dollars to cover taxes or insurance, hoping to dupe people into sending money. The call may come from the 202 Washington, D.C., area code (in which the FTC headquarters are located) to give the false impression that it’s a legitimate call.

“This is just a scheme using the well-known names of Make-A-Wish and the FTC to rob thousands of dollars from people,” the FTC warns on its website. “Once you wire money or send banking information, you will never see your money again.”

The agency provides these tips to protect yourself:

“If someone asks you to wire money or provide your bank account information over the telephone, it’s a scam.”

“Anytime you have to pay to get a prize, it’s a scam.”

“The FTC doesn’t oversee sweepstakes, and no FTC staff is involved in giving out sweepstakes prizes. We do, however, go after sweepstakes scams like this one.”

Consumers are encouraged to report scams to the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP or online at ftc.gov/complaint.

Source: William E. Gibson, AARP Daily, September 28, 2017


County Corner at Moorestown Mall

We are still collecting the following items for the County Corner (located on the Route 38 side of the Moorestown Mall, in the concourse just outside Sears):

  • New or used CDs to be shipped to military service members or recovering wounded soldiers
  • Used cell phones with batteries and chargers for emergency use by seniors and women at risk of domestic violence.  Please bring these in large zip-top bags to keep pieces together.
  • Pet supplies, old blankets and towels, used ink or toner cartridges to support the County Animal Shelter
  • Worn and tattered American flags for proper disposal by the Veterans Services Office

Sponsor Support

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Please continue to save your ShopRite receipts, and turn them in at our monthly meetings or send them to the WNW post office box:

WNW

P.O. Box 834

Willingboro, NJ 08046

WNW receives a small percentage, which is a major source of funds for our activities.  We submit receipts by quarter: (Jan – Mar) (Apr – June) (July – Sept) (Oct – Dec).  Receipts are due by the 5th of the month following the end of the quarter.  After that, the receipts are not valid for rebate.  Receipts from the following ShopRite stores will be accepted:

ShopRite of Burlington ShopRite of Delran ShopRite of Ark Road (Mt. Laurel)

Wishing Well Plaza 1310 Fairview Boulevard 127 Ark Road

1817 Burlington-Mt. Holly Road (Rte. 541)

      

ShopRIte of Hainesport ShopRite of Cinnaminson

Rte. 38 East  & Rte. 541 Bypass 141 Rte. 130 South

 

Don’t forget to attend and to participate in our meetings, and please volunteer when possible!  Do you have suggestions for a topic or a guest speaker?  Share them with us at our meeting or through our website:

www.willingborowatch.org

Please join us!

Meeting Info:

*WNW meetings are held on the last Wednesday of each month at 7:00PM at:

The Kennedy Center

Senior Center

 John F. Kennedy Way

Willingboro, NJ

The exceptions are August & December, when there are no meetings.

Please turn off cell phones at meetings. If conversing with someone, please do so outside the meeting in fairness to all members Please join us!

Meeting Info:

*WNW meetings are held on the last Wednesday of each month at 7:00PM at:

The Kennedy Center

Senior Center

 John F. Kennedy Way

Willingboro, NJ

The exceptions are August & December, when there are no meetings.

Please turn off cell phones at meetings. If conversing with someone, please do so outside the meeting in fairness to all members and guest speakers.  All announcements are limited to one minute and must be reviewed and approved by the Board.

*Township Council meetings are held the first and third Tuesdays of each month at  7:00PM at the Municipal Building.

*School Board meetings are held the second and fourth Mondays of each month at 7:00PM at:

Country Club School

 

Windover Lane